Message Board Thread - "Evaluating corners"

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Evaluating corners the darbster 4/2/2011
In addition to thermal bridging, is it possible to identify air leakage at corners without mechanical negative pressure?
Can anyone comment on whether the second image suggests air leakage. It looks like an air pattern on the cladding to me
thanks
 
Re:Evaluating corners David Brown 4/4/2011
I only see one image here. Can you provide either a corresponding digital (visual) image or a bit more of a description? Indoors? Outdoors? What type of building? What type of walls? Ambient temperature? etc.

Thanks.
 
Re:Evaluating corners the darbster 4/4/2011
Oops.here it is. It's -5 C out/14 C inside.
Steel stud walls, with Roxul, gypsum and Kingspan.
 
Re:Evaluating corners IRJay 4/6/2011
Resembles a conduction pattern as the sheeting does not have a thermal break into the corner. It also has some covection pattern as the seal from the corrugation into the corner is not complete and the air pressure on the interior will push this warm air to the outside.
 
Re:Evaluating corners fijidreamer 4/7/2011
Although I believe Jay has the correct evaluation, I would add that at -5C even ice would be warmer than that wall. There appears to be staining in the corner and perhaps the constant warm air inside is condensing at night. At those temps less than 20% humidity would be required (still high for indoors though). The inside air pressure will, over time insure that the condensation finds the lowest elevation, which in this case could be down the corner, and into the cladding. (If so, your air leak evaluation is also correct!)
 
Re:Evaluating corners RBurney 4/12/2011
fijidreamer wrote:
h I believe Jay has the correct evaluation, I would add that at -5C even ice would be warmer than that wall. There appears to be staining in the corner and perhaps the constant warm air inside is condensing at night. At those temps less than 20% humidity would be required (still high for indoors though). The inside air pressure will, over time insure that the condensation finds the lowest elevation, which in this case could be down the corner, and into the cladding. (If so, your air leak evaluation is also correct!)
With a manometer, it would be useful to know the building pressure with respect to the outside. This being on the ground floor, I would be surprised to see air leakage create such a long thermal imprint.
 


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