Message Board Thread - "Infrared procedure "

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Infrared procedure catlinj 6/26/2000
Hi there.

I do the scanning for the largest electrical supply company in Sotuh Africa.

This technology is very new here and I need to find out what procedures are used around the world in other utilities working from 11Kv to 800Kv.

Please feel free to contact me at John.Catlin@eskom.co.za

Regards
John
 
RE:Infrared procedure Bob Rogers 6/27/2000
It is best to perform scanning with a long-wave infrared camera which is less prone to solar reflections and loading. Also, the use of a telephoto(narrow angular) lens is necessary to view the high voltage line equipment because of the safe distance required.

The time of the day, preferably in hazy, early morning, high electrical loading of the outdoor equipment or early evening after sun-down is the best time to remove the effects of solar loading on highly thermally-reflective metals that make up cable connections etc.


Other considerations on notification of the area manager and safety is also paramount.
 
RE:RE:Infrared procedure catlinj 6/28/2000
Thank You Mr. Rogers

I use the Thermacam PM 595 to do the scanning and we have a big safety manager who makes sure I fit into all the safety aspects.

I tend to sometimes under strict supervision enter Live Chambers which are operating at 400Kv to do scanning on Capacitor Banks.

Do you prehaps have a procedure in place telling you the values you need to look for on connections and cables? Also how hot is too hot for equipment???

Would be great if you could share this info. with me so I can get a standard in place in this comapny and maybe country to fit in with the rest of the world.

Regards
John
 
RE:RE:Infrared procedure jayreynolds 6/29/2000
Dear bob,
am I correct in thinking that the solar reflections only become a problem
when using shortwave IR equipment that detects the reflective IR spectrum below 3 microns?
That is, would solar reflections be seen at all using equipment that, say, detects 5-20 microns?
 
RE:RE:RE:Infrared procedure Gary Orlove 6/29/2000
Unfortunately no. The sun is a powerful infrared radiator and emits energy in all IR wavebands. However, the relative amount the sun emits reduces as the wavelength increases, just as Planck's law says it should.

So,as we move out to longer wavelengths the amount of energy that reflects from the sun compared to the energy emitted by our targets gets smaller. This means that IR cameras that view in the longer wavelengths would be "bothered" less by solar reflections.

So the LW (8-13 ┬Ám) IR cameras see the least amount of reflected solar energy. This makes surveys easier for the operator as the true "hot spots" are easier to find.

Gary Orlove
Infrared Training Center
 
Re:Infrared procedure greenlabs 4/18/2012
catlinj wrote:
ou Mr. Rogers

I use the Thermacam PM 595 to do the scanning and we have a big safety manager who makes sure I fit into all the safety aspects.

I tend to sometimes under strict supervision enter Live Chambers which are operating at 400Kv to do scanning on Capacitor Banks.

Do you prehaps have a procedure in place telling you the values you need to look for on connections and cables? Also how hot is too hot for equipment???

Would be great if you could share this info. with me so I can get a standard in place in this comapny and maybe country to fit in with the rest of the world.

Regards
John
Great hazard!
Better if you fit the wall with transparent window, realized with special materials IR transparent: you need just calibrate it and, much bettr, recalibrated you r system including in the optical path the vison windows.
About the wavelength I agree with Gary: the best one is the long wave camera (8-12 micron)
Mauro
 
Re:Infrared procedure dandersen 4/18/2012
Did you consider your reply for 12 years before replying!? ;-)

For a minute I though Bob Rodgers was posting here again!
 


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