Message Board Thread - "Infrared heater element protection"

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Infrared heater element protection Privitmj 4/3/2012
I'm looking for a material that will protect the inside of a custom heater from debris but will also alow IR to pass through. I know that if I increase the temperature of the heating element, the wavelength of peak IR spectrum decreases. So in theory I could use plexiglass (or a material that can handle the thermal load)or another material that allows IR to pass. My question is: What if I used a thin layer of fiberglass and coated it all the way around in a highly emissive paint?
 
Re:Infrared heater element protection IRsloopyeah 4/5/2012
Flir has a IR window so you can look through to see your elements Iriss also has a window if your iterested. so does Fluke. im not realy understanding what is going on with what your trying to do?
 
Re:Infrared heater element protection daffodil1003 5/16/2012
Privitmj wrote:
king for a material that will protect the inside of a custom heater from debris but will also alow IR to pass through. I know that if I increase the temperature of the heating element, the wavelength of peak IR spectrum decreases. So in theory I could use plexiglass (or a material that can handle the thermal load)or another material that allows IR to pass. My question is: What if I used a thin layer of fiberglass and coated it all the way around in a highly emissive paint?

I don't understand question
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Re:Infrared heater element protection jvoitl 5/16/2012
Infrared will not pass through plexiglass or fiberglass. Also if you coat anything with a highly emissive paint the transmissivity will be very low. If you have spent the money for an IR camera I suggest you spend a little more for a level 1 course.
 
Re:Infrared heater element protection JKEngineer 5/17/2012
Privitmj:

I have read this thread several times and I think I finally understand what you are trying to do.

Is this it?
You have a process heater that operates in the infrared and you want to protect the heating element from debris in the area.

If so, then you need a material that is transparent in the IR wavelengths that the heater provides. Realistically, the heater will be providing energy in a broad waveband, so its "characteristic" wavelength related to its element's temperature is not actually a useful piece of information. Using an IR opaque material and coating it (your fiberglass suggestion) will not accomplish what you want. It would end up using the heater to heat the cover which would then re-radiate to the process or target. It is likely that the cover would not get anywhere near the operating temperature of the heater. It is likely that the entire assembly would be far less effective or efficient than the original without the cover.

If this is what you are trying to do, then these comments may be of use. If not, then I am still confused as to your intent.

If you wish, you may contact me offline and we can see if I can help you directly. (I am a consultant, after all.)

Jack
ack M. Kleinfeld, P.E.
Kleinfeld Technical Services, Inc.
Infrared Thermography, Finite Element Analysis, Process Engineering

Bronx, NY 10463

718-884-6644
866-884-6644 toll free
212-214-0919 fax and voice mail
Skype: JKEngineer

JKEngineer@aol.com or JKEngineer@KleinfeldTechnical.com
come see what we can do for you: http://www.KleinfeldTechnical.com

 


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