Message Board Thread - "IR scan of heel"

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IR scan of heel micjk 11/5/2004
Hi,
Medical IR is not my forte, and do not intend to pursue it, but I guess I have a little "Curious George" in me. I have what I believe is a heel spur and out of curiosity "shot" both my heels just to see if there was a difference. Here are the scans. Why would the bad heel appear colder in the spot that is giving me pain? Just curious. As I stated I have no intentions of using IR for medical purposes, Industrial application is my forte.
 
Re:IR scan of heel jvoitl 11/17/2004
Just a thought. Possibly the heel spur is putting pressure on blood vessels in the heal resulting in reduced blood flow. Like you, I'm not into medical either.
 
Re:IR scan of heel jcrawford 12/1/2004
The 'sympathetic' nervous system reacts by reducing blood flow. Medical imaging always requires acclimation of the body to 70F a minimum of 15 min prior to the image. The information can be skewed if not.
What information can be determined from this is based on the duration and cause of the pain. Injury? cold usually indicates nerve involvement. Medical IR is NEVER cut and dry. Only a medical practitioner with IR training can truly evaluate this. Others will dismiss it due to lack of knowledge. Monitor this, as nerve damage can become irreversible. But then again, the image can provide misrepresentation if not taken properly. Something 'unqualified' practitioners use to back up unnecessary treatment. Good luck.
JC
 
Re:IR scan of heel Manuel 12/1/2004
hi jcrawford

seems that you have excellent medical backgroung in combination with infrared.

where i can read more from you?..

regards
roberto cruz
 
Re:IR scan of heel Dr Brioschi 12/1/2004
Dear sir,

IR imaging is an adjunt method that can help physicians diagnose heel spur or monitor its evolution. Sorry but I suggest you repeat your IR images more distant, with your feet together, to see your foot plant (send it to me). It is not possible to do a right diagnosis this way. And in your case I suggest you to find a doctor to confirm the diagnosis and help to treat you. Best wishes !!!
www.drbrioschi.com.br
 
Re:IR scan of heel micjk 12/6/2004
Thanks to all for your replies. Very informative. Like I said I am not an Medical IR person nor practioner, IR facsinates me (as do all the Predictive Maintenance techniques).
 
Re:IR scan of heel Manuel 12/7/2004
hi again to all of you guys ,,

i found this interesting link that talks about Standards and Protocols in Clinical Thermographic Imaging

http://www.iact-org.org/professionals/thermog-guidelines.html#definition

enjoy it.

roberto cruz
thermoimagen
 
Re:IR scan of heel frostbitebuster 12/8/2005
A standard protocol would certainly help in the interpretation, i think

Interesting site Manuel, thanks
 
Re:IR scan of heel Dr Cockburn 2/9/2007
There is another solution to the question of the cold heel.

Experience in thermal imaging in medicine reveals that due to callous formation on the skin, and a generally small capillary network in the region, the heel is most often cold, and in the images you have provided, the left heel (good heel) is more likely than not a typical temperature.

The sympathetic response (fight or flight vaso-constriction of the dermal capillaries) is a possibility, however it is more likely that due to the pain of the heel spur, your gait is shifted to the right foot altering normal hydromechanics and causing increased heel strike during the gait cycle.

The increased pressure on the heel from favoring the sore heel would also have a significant impact on the ankle and tibialis muscle at the front of the leg (shinsplints) which would also appear quite hyperthermic.

In the image I have attached, the feet are pointing downward and the right foot can be seen to be hypothermia (cool) in the lateral-most four toes. This is a classic example of a fight or flight response cooling from a lumbar spine nerve root injury. The left heel is slightly cool, a normal finding, but the outside edge of the right heel is warmer, again from altered ambulatory or gait kinetics.

www.thermodoc.com The Thermodoc Network
 


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