Message Board Thread - "(PPE) for Electrical inspections? "

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(PPE) for Electrical inspections? Troy 12/7/2006
Other than the standard ppe safety glasses what should I be using when doing MCC/local disconnect inspections that are under load/live 480v range? I am still trying to prove the potential danger of arc flash during my inspections to my co-workers. is there any video or something to prove the danger?
 
Re:(PPE) for Electrical inspections? IRJay 12/7/2006
You really need to attend a safety training class. By stating that the only safety equipment you have is glasses demonstrate a lack of fundamental safety knowledge. There are many sources of reading material to explain proper PPE and arc flash dangers. None of which can be covered in a paragraph on this forum. Please get trained!!!
 
Re:(PPE) for Electrical inspections? Carl M 12/8/2006
Training is a must.

In the meantime, always wear the safety glasses, and only natural fiber clothing(cotton)and long sleeve shirts.

Carl M.
 
Re:(PPE) for Electrical inspections? ies_surfninja 12/8/2006
Please use (FR) ,flame retardant, clothing. Not one single arc flash cat. allows only natural cotton. The FR clothing is all cotton with a coating. Go to Oberon for FR glasses, etc.

See below posts and just google "arc flash" and you'll find more than enough reading,etc. for co-workers.


 
Re:(PPE) for Electrical inspections? Laland 12/10/2006
Electrical Faults including Arc Flashes happens or occurs at the least unexpected time. Do not wait for the unexpected.
 
Re:(PPE) for Electrical inspections? Carl M 12/11/2006
ies_surfninja wrote:
use (FR) ,flame retardant, clothing. Not one single arc flash cat. allows only natural cotton. The FR clothing is all cotton with a coating. Go to Oberon for FR glasses, etc.

See below posts and just google "arc flash" and you'll find more than enough reading,etc. for co-workers.


Actually, see the NFPA 70E table 130.7(C)(10) PPE Matrix.
Category 0, dictates the clothing I mention.

Many tasks listed in the Table 130.7(C)(9)(a) Hazard/Risk Category Classifications list Category 0. I've conducted many arc flash analyses and most electrical equipment downstream of the main distribution panels are Cat 0. Most, if not all equipment protected by current limiting fuses will calculate to a Cat 0 hazard. Of course, we can not assume these ratings if the arc flash analysis has not been done. Here is a link to Cooper Bussman arc flash calulator. http://www.bussmann.com/apen/arcflash/popups/notes.asp
You can input circuit information and the calculator will show the hazard level and flash protection boundary.

If you do not have the arc flash analysis for a facility, to inspect electrical services and main distribution equipment you should have fire-rated clothing and face protection. Stay away from the enclosures while the mechanics remove any doors. Do not break the parallel plane of the enclosure opening with the camera or any part of your body.

I do have arc flash articles from the NFPA 70E authors and other experts. I'd be glad to forward them to anyone on request.

Carl M.

www.applied-standards.com
 
Re:(PPE) for Electrical inspections? LB 1/6/2007
Check the NFPA 70E. If you are not in a union, then maybe an electrical trade organization offers it. There are many video's in this course.This is an excellent class and if you are working on live parts, it's a must!
 
Re:(PPE) for Electrical inspections? David Furley 1/8/2007
Consider installing infrared viewing panes so that you can image through closed panels in complete safety but ensure that the infrared viewing pane is certified to IEEEC.37.20.2 section a.3.6. so that you do not derate your switchgear. Take a look at IRISS VPFR IR viewing panes on www.infraredwindow.com
 
Re:(PPE) for Electrical inspections? Jimmy Pass 1/11/2007
David Furley wrote:
r installing infrared viewing panes so that you can image through closed panels in complete safety but ensure that the infrared viewing pane is certified to IEEEC.37.20.2 section a.3.6. so that you do not derate your switchgear. Take a look at IRISS VPFR IR viewing panes on www.infraredwindow.com
David, have your windows ever been Arc-Tested? What is the plastic optic's calorie withstand capability in cal/cm2 and corresponding NFPA70e Hazard/Risk category?

Without the above testing, full FRC is still needed to comply with NFPA70e - even if you use your IR windows - because they do not provide the protection needed by the standard.

If it's not arc-tested, it's not safe.....






 
Re:(PPE) for Electrical inspections? Thomas Gray 1/19/2007
Most of the time (80% maybe) the Risk Category is 0 for the thermographer. Some of time (10 or 15% possibly) the Risk Category is 1 for the thermographer. And rest (5 or 10%) maybe Risk Category 2 for the thermographer. The reason we wear PPE all the time is that we don't which falls in the 80% and which in the 10 or 15% or which in the 5 or 10% category.

That presumes the thermographer doesn't touch anything and stands far away (20 feet or more) or outside the room when the qualified electrician is doing his or her thing. The thermographer stands 4 feet or more away when taking IR images and photos also. If the IRT does that and wears PPE, he or she is reasonably well protected against Arc Flash hazards during IR surveys.

Here http://www.reliableplant.com/article.asp?articleid=4286 is an article on the subject.
 


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