Message Board Thread - "Steam Cooling Hot Spots On Furnace Refractory"

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Steam Cooling Hot Spots On Furnace Refractory pcm ir man 1/26/2007
Could anyone provide any tech papers on how to cool hot spots on on the outer shell of a furnace when the refractory fails.At present we use compressed air but this is very costly and we have an abundance of steam from our processes. if no tech papers could anyone provide advice on how to do this safely please.Any calculations or case studies would be great because i have a doubtfull boss.
 
Re:Steam Cooling Hot Spots On Furnace Refractory ecruz 1/28/2007
Low pressure steam should be a more efficient cooling medium for external hot spots similar to what you have. This is common practice in a refinery for a short term fix until you can shutdown and repair the problem. Another option you might want to try is to drill a small hole in the shell and pump refractory to fill the damage area. There are outfits who specialize in this kind of repair work.
 
Re:Steam Cooling Hot Spots On Furnace Refractory pcm ir man 1/28/2007
Thanks. PCM IR MAN
 
Re:Steam Cooling Hot Spots On Furnace Refractory Michael 2/7/2007
In the past, we've welded boxes to the outer skin and pumped it. Works well and should buy you more than enough time.
 
Re:Steam Cooling Hot Spots On Furnace Refractory pcm ir man 4/13/2007
ecruz wrote:
ssure steam should be a more efficient cooling medium for external hot spots similar to what you have. This is common practice in a refinery for a short term fix until you can shutdown and repair the problem. Another option you might want to try is to drill a small hole in the shell and pump refractory to fill the damage area. There are outfits who specialize in this kind of repair work.
Any ideas of companys that can drill and pump. I can only find Unifrax??????

 
Re:Steam Cooling Hot Spots On Furnace Refractory ecruz 4/19/2007
You can contact Pat Reynolds of Industrial Gunite. Their phone no. is 713-477-0331. They have done numerous refractory repair work in one of my client refineries in Houston.
 
Re:Steam Cooling Hot Spots On Furnace Refractory pcm ir man 4/20/2007
ecruz wrote:
contact Pat Reynolds of Industrial Gunite. Their phone no. is 713-477-0331. They have done numerous refractory repair work in one of my client refineries in Houston.
Thank you for the info.. Regards Anthony
 
Re:Steam Cooling Hot Spots On Furnace Refractory Michael 4/22/2007
ecruz wrote:
contact Pat Reynolds of Industrial Gunite. Their phone no. is 713-477-0331. They have done numerous refractory repair work in one of my client refineries in Houston.
I would wager that you are referring to the Coker F-1 Heater at Crown.
 
Re:Steam Cooling Hot Spots On Furnace Refractory ecruz 4/22/2007
It is over at the Shell Deer Park Refinery. A SMR Furnace and several Vacuum Flasher Furnaces.
 
Re:Steam Cooling Hot Spots On Furnace Refractory Toolman 4/25/2007
If practical you might consider using a water mist or spray - take advantage of the latent heat of vaporization...........
 
Re:Steam Cooling Hot Spots On Furnace Refractory pcm ir man 4/26/2007
Toolman wrote:
tical you might consider using a water mist or spray - take advantage of the latent heat of vaporization...........
Practicle in some parts of the site, but not others. In use at the moment via a water spray bar application... but it again is using up resources to cool, and since the flues/funace temp changes with process eg from 1100°C to 1400°C involves a lot of tweaking. This method was employed because we lost the refractory & cold shell. So decission made to plate out the area ( Live ) so we had to cool the plate etc....Ongoing
 
Re:Steam Cooling Hot Spots On Furnace Refractory pcm ir man 4/26/2007
Toolman wrote:
tical you might consider using a water mist or spray - take advantage of the latent heat of vaporization...........
Practicle in some parts of the site, but not others. In use at the moment via a water spray bar application... but it again is using up resources to cool, and since the flues/funace temp changes with process eg from 1100°C to 1400°C involves a lot of tweaking. This method was employed because we lost the refractory & cold shell. So decission made to plate out the area ( Live ) so we had to cool the plate etc....Ongoing
 


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