Message Board Thread - "Conductor Insulation"

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Conductor Insulation Laland 3/23/2007
While doing and inspection, I have noticed some conductors on a cable tray hat has temperature at 50 and 60 degrees C. When it was traced, it was forund to be supplying a cooling water pump. Before the connection box, the conductor temperature is at 65 degrees C.

I would like to ask therefore, at what temperature that we can say that the conductor is on its critical level and that degradation on the insulation of the conductor will start? How does degradation on the insulation develop?

Any websites on conductor manufacturer will be appreciated.

Many thanks.
 
Re:Conductor Insulation IRJay 3/26/2007
NEC table 310-13 will give you the max temp of each conductor type.

Manufacturer can provide additional breakdown information.
 
Re:Conductor Insulation ies_surfninja 3/30/2007
I hate to say it but the IR fellas that are pseudo scientists need to rethink their IR future. There are many, many electricians, and mechanical fellas, etc. that are experts with a lot of experience that can use an IR camera and already know how interpret IR inspection info that the IR "expert" has no clue about. Most eletricians and the like are tired of IR "experts" that aren't qualified to offer solutions to IR anomalies. The below question is a perfect example.

Ya'll have a good weekend!
 
Re:Conductor Insulation swptln 5/10/2007
ies_surfninja wrote:
to say it but the IR fellas that are pseudo scientists need to rethink their IR future. There are many, many electricians, and mechanical fellas, etc. that are experts with a lot of experience that can use an IR camera and already know how interpret IR inspection info that the IR "expert" has no clue about. Most eletricians and the like are tired of IR "experts" that aren't qualified to offer solutions to IR anomalies. The below question is a perfect example.

Ya'll have a good weekend!
There are a number of factors that have to be put into play on this question. Article 310 will not give you the maximum temp of conductor insulation. Article 310 gives you allowable ampacity based on temp ratings of conductors and ambient air temps.
Your going to find that UL the manufacturer and Chapter 9 of the NEC are going to be your best source of information that your looking for.
I agree with the above post, only an electrician is going to be able to evaluate your possible problem.
 
Re:Conductor Insulation Bob Berry 5/10/2007
Although I am an electrician myself I disagree that only electricians can do electrical thermography. I know and have met MANY very good electrical thermographers, some electricians, some not. Your suggestion implies that only roofing guys can do roofing thermography, and only building guys can do building thermography etc etc. Taken to its extreme it could mean that only high voltage electricians should only do high voltage thermography, and only low voltage electricians should do low voltage thermography. This is of course complete garbage.

I also dislike your phrase "pseudo scientists" as implies non-electricians are neither sincere nor authentic, and again this is not true.

Even though I am a qualified electrician, I have worked exclusively as a thermographer for the last ten years, and I know I would rather hire an infrared trained guy that is not an electrician than an electrician that is not trained in infrared. I can guarantee the infrared trained guy will make less mistakes, as most mistakes come from not understanding infrared theory, not electrical theory.

I have met electricians like yourself that feel they are uniquely qualified to do thermography, simply because they are electricians. Be careful you may not be as much of an expert as you think, experiance alone is not enough. There are a lot of companies that see the value in independant advice, they do not want there thermographer to offer other solutions as they know it compromises the impartiality of the thermography.
 


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