Message Board Thread - "Overhead transmission line porcelain insulator pin shank"

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Overhead transmission line porcelain insulator pin shank ricky 3/18/2008
Hello guys, a newbie in this forum asking anyone if it is possible to determine or detect corrosion of an overhead transmission line porcelain insulator pin shank through infrared thermography. Thank you very much and more power...
 
Re:Overhead transmission line porcelain insulator pin shank jvoitl 3/20/2008
I'm not familiar with the part you are talking about but it doesn't sound like something that normally carries current. If it isn't then you won't see anything. Could you insert a digital picture?
 
Re:Overhead transmission line porcelain insulator pin shank manuel-thermoimagen 3/21/2008
ricky wrote:
uys, a newbie in this forum asking anyone if it is possible to determine or detect corrosion of an overhead transmission line porcelain insulator pin shank through infrared thermography. Thank you very much and more power...
maybe by infrared could be hard.
i am sure that using good binoculars will be able the traces of corrosion.
 
Re:Overhead transmission line porcelain insulator pin shank ricky 3/24/2008
Attached is an IR image of an Insulator strings having 2 corroded pin shank and 2 good pin shank . Said insulator strings are heated under the sun for almost 2 hours to obtain temperature. Below are recorded temperatures,

Date 3/19/2008
Image Time 10:06:35 AM
Filename IR_0278.jpg
Image Camera Type P65 NTSC
Image Serial Number 23404247
Image Camera Lens FOV 24
Emissivity 0.87
Object Distance 2.0 m
Reflected Temperature 41.9 °C
Atmospheric Temperature 45.8 °C
Relative Humidity 81.0 %
Max Temperature 42.0 °C
Min Temperature 30.9 °C
Sp1 Temperature 37.6 °C
Sp2 Temperature 36.5 °C
Sp3 Temperature 36.9 °C
Sp4 Temperature 37.1 °C

Sp1/Sp2 are temperature of corroded pin shank while Sp3/Sp4 are for good pin shank. Hence, with a little temperature deviation, it is very hard to determine corroded pin shank through thermography... Thanks
 
Re:Overhead transmission line porcelain insulator pin shank Dan Ninedorf 4/1/2008
ricky wrote:
uys, a newbie in this forum asking anyone if it is possible to determine or detect corrosion of an overhead transmission line porcelain insulator pin shank through infrared thermography. Thank you very much and more power...
Understanding where the corrosion starts helps to understand what tool to use to see the cause of the corrosion.
Corona causes corrosion, corona produces nitric acid in the presence of moisture from the air, sound, ultraviolet light, ozone and may raise the temperature of the air locally (small ball) about 4 to 7 degrees F when the corona is really active.
Corona starts and stops, dependent upon variables voltage applied, atmospheric pressure, temeperature, wind speed, ...
So if you want to find corrosion use a visible indication, if you want to find the cause of the corrosion or damaged insulators use a corona camera and ultrasound, if you want to find NCI insulator damaged areas and conductor damage use corona and infrared cameras, or to do all of these inspections concurrently use a MultiCAM with ultrasound option www.specialcamera.com
 
Re:Overhead transmission line porcelain insulator pin shank RickyB 4/1/2008
manuel-thermoimagen wrote:
maybe by infrared could be hard.
i am sure that using good binoculars will be able the traces of corrosion.
It's been my experience that binoculars are the best bet. I scan string insulators a good bit of my time. I can see tracking that occasionally causes outages, but so far I've not been able to help the line crews spot rusting pins. Late morning, if the rust has scaled enough to hold any water or dew, the rusty pins might appear cooler than the others.
 
Re:Overhead transmission line porcelain insulator pin shank Derrick 4/1/2008
RickyB wrote:
It's been my experience that binoculars are the best bet. I scan string insulators a good bit of my time. I can see tracking that occasionally causes outages, but so far I've not been able to help the line crews spot rusting pins. Late morning, if the rust has scaled enough to hold any water or dew, the rusty pins might appear cooler than the others.
If you google my name I made a presentation in 2005 at teh Inframation Conference. I touched on the insulator issue a bit as it is something we take seriously at HydroOne. In the back are some reference reading sites with more detail about the work we have taken with detecting Insulator anomalies utilizing IR technology.
 
Re:Overhead transmission line porcelain insulator pin shank Derrick 4/1/2008
Derrick wrote:
If you google my name I made a presentation in 2005 at teh Inframation Conference. I touched on the insulator issue a bit as it is something we take seriously at HydroOne. In the back are some reference reading sites with more detail about the work we have taken with detecting Insulator anomalies utilizing IR technology.
Sorry, google Derrick Brydges
 
Re:Overhead transmission line porcelain insulator pin shank ricky 4/8/2008
Derrick wrote:
If you google my name I made a presentation in 2005 at teh Inframation Conference. I touched on the insulator issue a bit as it is something we take seriously at HydroOne. In the back are some reference reading sites with more detail about the work we have taken with detecting Insulator anomalies utilizing IR technology.
Sir Derrick,

Good Day, Thanks for your informative presentation in 2005 at teh Inframation Conference. It could be much more helpful for us newbie in the world of thermography if you can post the generated reports of that said transmission lines anomalies. Also, if you dont mind, please include severity index of fault rating, particularly for transmission lines. Thank you very much and more power...

ricky
 
Re:Overhead transmission line porcelain insulator pin shank fazlye 4/8/2008
Dan Ninedorf wrote:
Understanding where the corrosion starts helps to understand what tool to use to see the cause of the corrosion.
Corona causes corrosion, corona produces nitric acid in the presence of moisture from the air, sound, ultraviolet light, ozone and may raise the temperature of the air locally (small ball) about 4 to 7 degrees F when the corona is really active.
Corona starts and stops, dependent upon variables voltage applied, atmospheric pressure, temeperature, wind speed, ...
So if you want to find corrosion use a visible indication, if you want to find the cause of the corrosion or damaged insulators use a corona camera and ultrasound, if you want to find NCI insulator damaged areas and conductor damage use corona and infrared cameras, or to do all of these inspections concurrently use a MultiCAM with ultrasound option www.specialcamera.com
Rick

from our experienced, the best way is to identify the cause of the corrosion first, then by using a good binocular you can actually know the degree of the corrosion. the rest i truly agree with Dan Ninedorf.

Infra red can be use but with a MULTICAM c/w ultrasound option.

hope it benefits you

 
Re:Overhead transmission line porcelain insulator pin shank ricky 4/9/2008
fazlye wrote:
Rick

from our experienced, the best way is to identify the cause of the corrosion first, then by using a good binocular you can actually know the degree of the corrosion. the rest i truly agree with Dan Ninedorf.

Infra red can be use but with a MULTICAM c/w ultrasound option.

hope it benefits you

Hello Fazlye,

I agree with you, infact it is an SOP for our line inspectors to climb live 69/138 KV woodpoles, sectionalized light weight towers, steel poles & steel towers to evaluate fault severity of its components/sub components including insulators and pin shanks. Regarding cause of corrosion, mostly anomalies observed at lines that traverses an Industrial Plants, i.e, Cement Plants and others. Also to lines that is located along coastal areas. Since we are planning to acquire a MultiCAm, Seeking your expertise to my following questions.

1. Assuming a porcelain insulator strings that have no cracks/broken disk, but with corroded pin shank/s. Does it emits Corona Discharge? that can be detected by a MultiCam?.

2. Is it always true that a porcelain insulator strings having a crack/broken disk/s emitted corona disharge and can be seen by a MultiCam?.

3. Does presence of algae, dust, etc. in the porcelain insulator string disk/s emitted corona discharge and can be seen by a MultiCam?.

4. Combining all above anomalies, is it always true that it emitted corona discharge and can be seen by a MutiCam?.

Thanks in advance for your expert & tested opinion..

Ricky
 
Re:Overhead transmission line porcelain insulator pin shank fazlye 4/12/2008
ricky wrote:
Hello Fazlye,

I agree with you, infact it is an SOP for our line inspectors to climb live 69/138 KV woodpoles, sectionalized light weight towers, steel poles & steel towers to evaluate fault severity of its components/sub components including insulators and pin shanks. Regarding cause of corrosion, mostly anomalies observed at lines that traverses an Industrial Plants, i.e, Cement Plants and others. Also to lines that is located along coastal areas. Since we are planning to acquire a MultiCAm, Seeking your expertise to my following questions.

1. Assuming a porcelain insulator strings that have no cracks/broken disk, but with corroded pin shank/s. Does it emits Corona Discharge? that can be detected by a MultiCam?.

2. Is it always true that a porcelain insulator strings having a crack/broken disk/s emitted corona disharge and can be seen by a MultiCam?.

3. Does presence of algae, dust, etc. in the porcelain insulator string disk/s emitted corona discharge and can be seen by a MultiCam?.

4. Combining all above anomalies, is it always true that it emitted corona discharge and can be seen by a MutiCam?.

Thanks in advance for your expert & tested opinion..

Ricky
dear ricky

Q1-Q4:to our experienced, YES, multicam with ultrasound option can actually help you to do all that.

But with reference to what Dan Ninedorf have quoted, i think it all goes back to the very basic question - what is causing all this?

Regular checking must be conducted to ensure that u can eventually predict when the fault will happen.

best luck!
 
Re:Overhead transmission line porcelain insulator pin shank Jun Pionela 5/28/2008
I think with a high end Flir camera the corrossion can be measured especially during peak load of the system were high current is available in the line and this corrossion in the insulators would probably cause a current to flow on it and a heat can be detected on the porcelain, so IR camera can be used.
 
Re:Overhead transmission line porcelain insulator pin shank ricky 1/9/2009
Jun Pionela wrote:
with a high end Flir camera the corrossion can be measured especially during peak load of the system were high current is available in the line and this corrossion in the insulators would probably cause a current to flow on it and a heat can be detected on the porcelain, so IR camera can be used.
Hello Jun.

I agree with you, attached is an IR image of a Type B structure having a broken hot end suspension porcelain insulator. Thanks....
 
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