Message Board Thread - "ok. I imaged a uh...indoor atmosphereic anomaly of some sort. ok."

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ok. I imaged a uh...indoor atmosphereic anomaly of some sort. ok. johnnyU 7/31/2008
First let me say I take thermography and my work quite seriously. In filming in an old building with a thermal cam I observed what seemed to be a puff of moisturinzed-air aimed at a gentleman down the hallway which appeared to have no steam or waterpipe source. The puff to me seemed to be about 10 degrees less than ambient maybe. The humidity was about 90%. I had set E=.97`````````` if I recall correctly and I had been running the unit for about 4 hours, so its sensitivity was beaming in pretty good, aka everything was good and running. I will attempt to upload a picture of this event. max-temp "white" was set at 98F. The enlargement shown here leaves out the scale info. I guess my question to you all is, not what it was I saw, but what the optimal emissivity setting should be for water-moisturized air which is all I can say this was comprised of?
 
Re:ok. I imaged a uh...indoor atmosphereic anomaly of some sort. ok. Gary Orlove 8/4/2008
1. Emissivity settings will not change the image on most infrared cameras, it will change the scale settings and any measurements you are making. So setting the emissivity will not let you see any better or find problems more easily.

2. Infrared cameras are designed to look through common atmospheric gases like water vapor. While you can sometimes see these gases, they are very difficult to measure unless you have a camera specifically designed to do so (and even then it is difficult because gases are volume emitters, emission depends on thickness of the gas cloud , pressure, temperature, and wavelength).
 
Re:ok. I imaged a uh...indoor atmosphereic anomaly of some sort. ok. johnnyU 9/11/2008
Gary Orlove wrote:
sivity settings will not change the image on most infrared cameras, it will change the scale settings and any measurements you are making. So setting the emissivity will not let you see any better or find problems more easily.

2. Infrared cameras are designed to look through common atmospheric gases like water vapor. While you can sometimes see these gases, they are very difficult to measure unless you have a camera specifically designed to do so (and even then it is difficult because gases are volume emitters, emission depends on thickness of the gas cloud , pressure, temperature, and wavelength).
thank you Gary.
 


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