Message Board Thread - "Explanation of heat around perimeter on the floor..?"

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Explanation of heat around perimeter on the floor..? DarrenL 1/27/2010
Hi there

Can anyone help me explain the reason for the heat on the ground around the perimeter of this building? I understand it isn't a problem, but I need to explain the cause.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

 
Re:Explanation of heat around perimeter on the floor..? IRJay 1/27/2010
Thermal bridge around the foundation. More heat is conducted through that material then the walls.
 
Re:Explanation of heat around perimeter on the floor..? Thermal Inspection Guy 2/9/2010
DarrenL wrote:
e

Can anyone help me explain the reason for the heat on the ground around the perimeter of this building? I understand it isn't a problem, but I need to explain the cause.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

I believe this is called conduction. If this is a heated floor the wood framing at the bottom is conducting heat.
 
Re:Explanation of heat around perimeter on the floor..? DarrenL 2/9/2010
Thank you, I understand it's conduction! But there is no heated flooring in this building. I guess, like IRJay said, the material along the ground is a better conductor of heat, which is why it shows up as being warmer.
 
Re:Explanation of heat around perimeter on the floor..? B. Boyd 2/9/2010
Is there a basement or is it slab on grade? What time of day were the pictures taken? Wind? What is the exterior wall construction? Masonry, EIFS?
 
Re:Explanation of heat around perimeter on the floor..? groundhogkid 2/9/2010
With that box out around the downspout termination, presumably right at grade, I'm leaning towards a slab on grade situation.
 
Re:Explanation of heat around perimeter on the floor..? DarrenL 2/10/2010
B. Boyd wrote:
e a basement or is it slab on grade? What time of day were the pictures taken? Wind? What is the exterior wall construction? Masonry, EIFS?
No basement around this side of the building, so I'd say slab-on-grade too. This image would have been taken around 11am (not ideal, I know), the temperature was at freezing and the wind was light (10mph), it was a cloudy day but there wasn't any rain.

The wall structure is a typical block-cavity-brick (UK), with the cavity being filled with rockwool insulation. There are no EIFS.
 
Re:Explanation of heat around perimeter on the floor..? gboyd 2/15/2010
DarrenL, you said that there was no basement on this side of the structure. Did you get the same IR readings where there was a basement? It might be helpfull to have both interior and exterior IR images of the same location and compare readings. If the downspout is three inches across in width then can we assume that the slab is also three inches in thickness ? What if you pressurized the interior and compared the exterior IR images for a thermal break and conversely depressuized the interior and viewed the same interior area for a thermal break ?
 
Re:Explanation of heat around perimeter on the floor..? glassman 4/2/2010
Hi Darren, The information you are giving is a bit mixed. However, you do say that it is UK style construction. This may be somthing to check. If you have a suspended floor or solid floor with ducting, the heating may well run under the floor and while the mainstructure is insulated by means of cavity fill that does not always mean that the hot pipes are lagged. If it is what is called a suspended floor then the ht pipes are heating he void under the dwelling area and it is the escape pf this heat that is showing. If on the other hand it is a concrete solid floor with ducts then this could be a heat weep from eiter the slab edge or cavity. I think that you need a bit more investigation on construction details.
 
Re:Explanation of heat around perimeter on the floor..? Infrared_Paul 5/19/2010
DarrenL, The first response you received is the correct one. Thermal Bridging is present in all (most) buildings. The photo I attached is from the inside of a building. Cold air enters building from lower level of wall and escapes building from top of wall. The phenomenon must be reversed on the outside of a structure.
 


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