Message Board Thread - "Radiant Ice Melt Systems"

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Radiant Ice Melt Systems DAVEVALLEY 11/28/2010
For those Thermographer's who are familiar with radiant ice melt systems, I would like you to confirm my interpretations of the attached image.

I'm curious as to why this type of embedded piping gets very hot in specific areas throughout the floor. Please take a look at the image I uploaded and tell me if these hot spots (bright yellow - circled) are simply from a bend in the piping.

Thanks in advance...
 
Re:Radiant Ice Melt Systems KJ666 11/28/2010
DAVEVALLEY wrote:
se Thermographer's who are familiar with radiant ice melt systems, I would like you to confirm my interpretations of the attached image.

I'm curious as to why this type of embedded piping gets very hot in specific areas throughout the floor. Please take a look at the image I uploaded and tell me if these hot spots (bright yellow - circled) are simply from a bend in the piping.

Thanks in advance...
Maybe these hot spots are where the pipes run closer to the floor surface. Can you be sure that they are all laying at the same height ?
 
Re:Radiant Ice Melt Systems DAVEVALLEY 11/29/2010
KJ666 wrote:
Maybe these hot spots are where the pipes run closer to the floor surface. Can you be sure that they are all laying at the same height ?
No I can not be sure that these pipes are lying at the same height. That's why I'm here asking this question to the Pros in this field.

My guess is that these hot spots along these embedded pipes are due to the piping configuration (higher or lower in those areas - slightly bent) but I'm just not sure.

Here's another view...

 
Re:Radiant Ice Melt Systems HarleyD 12/3/2010
I would suggest doing an ultrsonic thickness test over the tubing runs and that should confirm the thickness of the floor over the tubing
 
Re:Radiant Ice Melt Systems hunka 12/3/2010
I would suspect that the flow in this system is restricted .
 
Re:Radiant Ice Melt Systems hunka 12/3/2010
I would suspect that the flow in this system is restricted or there might be thining in the piping in these areas.
 
Re:Radiant Ice Melt Systems micjay 12/3/2010
It can be a number of things. IR is sensitive to the emmisivity constant. It could be the piping pulled away from the concrete, air gap, and is touching in the "hot spots". If it is concrete, concrete shrinks. Corrosion build up on the inside of outside of the pipe changing transmission rates. If the heating material is clean I doubt plugging. Air in high points will cause it to be cooler.
 
Re:Radiant Ice Melt Systems Hill Top TI 12/3/2010
I agree with HarleyD The hotter spots are areas closer to the surface of the concrete or bitumen. I can almost imagine a bobcat tying to level out the stone leaving a wave effect behind causing the tubing to be at variable depths.
 
Re:Radiant Ice Melt Systems DAVEVALLEY 12/4/2010
Thank you for your feedback Gentlemen.

My guess is that this heat build-up is simply from a slight bend in the embedded piping, causing heated water to become restricted which in turn will become hotter in these areas.
 
Re:Radiant Ice Melt Systems Mrthermalman 12/6/2010
High and low spots in the piping will cause this also were the pipes connect together at couplings
 
Re:Radiant Ice Melt Systems manuel-thermoimagen 12/6/2010
i am agree with micjay & Hill top TI,
this seems to be some sort of level issue where installation of pipe into concret is not even at all around floor.

i dont know if some "pipe finders" have ability to measure deep of pipe.

my two cents.
roberto.cruz@thermoimagen.com
 


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